Record Participation in Democratic County Party Reorganization

Nashville, Tenn. (April 17, 2017) –

Over the past few weeks, thousands of Tennesseans gathered and reorganized 84 of 92 eligible county parties, and elected 52 new county party chairs. The change in leadership in more than half of the counties reflects a more energized group of Tennessee Democrats who are ready to stand up in their communities.  

Chair of the Tennessee Democratic Party, Mary Mancini said, “We have seen a huge amount of new energy and interest in the Democratic Party since election day. People from all parts of Tennessee are becoming more active citizens, holding elected officials accountable and joining their county parties.

Seven of the new chairs were candidates for the state legislature last year. Khristy Wilkinson, who ran for State Senate in Chattanooga, is now the Hamilton County chair. 2016 State Representative candidates Holly McCall (Williamson), Sharon Kay Edward (Bedford), Marjorie Ramsey (Cocke), Daniel Powell (Henry), Amos Powers (Putnam), and Deborah Reed (Tipton) were all elected chair of their respective county.

The tenacity shown by these former candidates represents their resolve and commitment to continue fighting for Democratic values. They see the Republican supermajority is focused on divisive issues that do not address the everyday needs of Tennesseans. Electing more Democrats starts with growing our county parties and effective and energetic leaders are essential to that effort,” Mancini added.

All told, over 2,000 people participated in the county party reorganizations. It appears that many of the people who showed up in post-election protests and marches are now getting involved formally in the local democratic process. Currently, Tennessee ranks near the bottom in voter participation.

Mancini said, “Increasing voter turnout should be a bipartisan goal. Everyone has a stake in these elections. Many people who thought both parties were the same or that elections didn’t matter realized this year just how large the consequences of elections are. Those people are not only now participating, but they are leading.”
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